Posts Tagged ‘stencyl’

stencyl-3

Feb 22

Stencyl 3.0 is Out Now

Stencyl is a fantastic tool and game engine for those who hate code but love making games. This tool speeds up the process of building games or game prototypes. The highly anticipated update of Stencyl 3.0 is finally here and the new version now supports publishing games to

iOS (iPhone/iPad) Android Flash Windows Mac Linux

Here are few features in the new version:

Platforms

Publish to iOS, Android, Flash, Standalone Desktop (Windows, Mac, Linux). Publish all games directly from your computer. Unification – 1 engine, 1 programming language (Haxe) Open Framework for building new native and pure Haxe extensions.

Other

Improved Font Support Improved Translation (Language Pack) Support Draw UTF-8 (international) characters in-game Gap Free MP3 Playback for Flash Support for OGG playback on all platforms except Flash Multi-Mapped Controls Mobile

Improved handling of arbitrary screen sizes. Improved Ad Support (iAds, AdMob, Events) Improved Social Gaming API Support (Game Center, Events) Improved In-App Purchase Support (Consumables, Restore Purchases, Events) Improved Native UI Support (Keyboard, Swipe, better Joystick, Alerts, Vibrate) Uniform handling of mouse and touch events

Workflow

Test on iOS without going through Xcode Universal Log Viewer No more MAC address requirement to test You don’t have to use atlases if you hate ‘em Engine

Improved Performance. Reduced memory usage and churn. Simple Physics Mode – opt out of physics for better performance if you don’t need it. Reduction of “works only on Flash” features. Core features work everywhere. Full Blending Mode support for Flash Full Screen Mode for Flash, Desktop

Obviously we need to wait and see what the game developers can do with it before we sing its praises, but the features in new version are a step in the right direction

stencyl game development engine

Apr 27

10 Game Development Tools You Should Know About

Game Engines are an important element for game developers. It eliminates many of the technicalities involved in developing a game and offers game developers the flexibility to focus on building the game. A game engine typically offers wide range of time saving tools for game building. If you are a beginner or a professional developer these top 10 Game development engines will serve as a guide for you to choose the best game engine for your gaming needs.

Unity 3D

The unity 3D game engine is free and comes with a wide array of assets for game building. The WYSIWYG tools offer the flexibility of easily changing or adding things. The Unity3d comes in different programming languages including the C#, Boo and JavaScript. You have the flexibility of combining any of these programming languages during your project and developers can easily play games in the editor. The Unity3d has a user friendly publishing feature. It essentially builds a complete game package with the click of a button. The game engine supports web applications, Mac and Windows. There are available upgrades for iOS and consoles.

Gamesalad

The GameSalad development suite makes game building simple and easy. You don’t need to wade through complex codes to develop a game. The GameSalad features check boxes, dropdowns and the oddlist similar to features you will see when using utility software like Photoshop. GameSalad can be published to multiple platforms like the Mac or iPhone as well as to devices using the Android platform like the Nook. The game engine has a real-time editing feature enabling scenes to be edited while the game is in play. The game preview feature allows the testing and debugging of memory usage and performance of games. The scene editor makes it super easy to manipulate actors in a scene. All you need to do is to drag and drop actors to alter how they are visualized in a scene.

Torque 2D

The Torque 2D features a powerful and user friendly 2D game engine. It offers a lot of the features of the 3D game engine which is custom-made for 2D gameplay. This game engine can be published to Mac, Windows, Xbox 360, Wii and the iPhone. The Torque 2 D’s intuitive and powerful editor makes game creation simple and easy, making it is ideal for individuals with little or no experience. The Level Editor features a host of WYSIWYG tools for game designing and editing. The Level Editor is built into the Torque runtime and offers complete access to the entire Torque subsystem. The powerful rendering of the Torque 2D is great for achieving an excellent artistic style.

Stencyl

This is a game engine that can be used to create 2D video games for the web, mobile devices and computers.. Stencyl has extensive platform support. Games built in Stencyl can be released to the web through the Adobe Flash Player and HTML5, to PCs as executable games and can also be exported to various mobile platforms like Android and iOS applications. Stencyl projects use the Haxe programming language and offers flexibility via the NME game framework by using the write once, run anywhere style of game development. The Stencyl application has several modules that can be utilized to create games. These include the Behavior Editor, Tileset Editor, Actor Editor as well as the Scene Designer. Power users are able to import existing code libraries, create and share their own blocks and create customized classes that seamlessly interact with block based behaviors.

Pygame

This is a suite of Python modules designed for game creation. With its functionality and excellent SDL library, pygame enables the creation of fully featured games in the python language. This software is free and allows you to create free open source. It has an inbuilt sillness that makes game creation fun. It does not require an open GL and uses either directx, windib, X11 in addition to various backends. The Multi Core CPUs can easily be utilized. Pygame is compatible with many operating systems and does not require set up tools or ctypes for installation and its simple and easy to use.

Corona

Corona is a robust game engine that features industry standard technologies including Lua, OpenAL and OpenGL. The Corona comes with the Box2D physics engine, Game Center, Facebook Connect and sprite sheets. With the Corona you can access a wide array of features you will need to create an exciting mobile game. You can easily monetize games via advertising and app purchasing. The Corona can be used on the various platforms including iOS, Kindle Fire, Android and NOOK. Games can easily be built with a single codebase and eliminates the complexities involved in game creation. The Corona SDK starter offers free building and publishing of apps for users.

GL Basic

This game engine offers a user friendly, flexible fast to write programming language. GL Basic offers the easiest and most intuitive programming language available making it ideal for writing high performance programs. No need to change the source code when starting your Linux, iPhone development GP2X/Wiz and PocketPC after writing a program, allowing users to concentrate on essentials when building games. GL Basic game engine is free for personal projects on Linux, Windows and Mac OSX. It is ideal for beginners who want to learn programming as a hobby.

Eclipse

Eclipse is a 2D game software based on the FMOD and SDL programming making it ideal for usage across different platforms. This game engine is easy to use and takes care of all the tedious tasks, enabling game developers to focus on other areas during the creation of the game.

RPG Maker VX

The RPG Maker VX features a simple operation that offers game builders the flexibility to create original role playing games with little or no expertise, making it an excellent game engine for beginner developers. The software comes with pre-made features so there is no need to learn the code. Simply build a game by pointing and clicking while adding a little creativity.

Related articles Intro to Game Design – Officially Endorsed by Stencyl! Leadwerks Developer Blog – Leadwerks 3 Brings Native Code to Mobile Games Develop Games for BlackBerry! Unity 4 Game Engine Becomes ‘Massively Multi-Platform’ Making a Game: Part 1 – They Are Who We Thought They Were
Stencyl

Feb 15

How Creating Games for iOS is Different

Gamers can testify that there is a huge difference when you play the same game on different platforms. For example if you were to play Assassin’s Creed on your PC it would be a completely different experience than playing it on the PS3 or Xbox 360. Mobile devices probably offer the most significant different in game play simply because the mobile devices required simplified controls.

The device makes a huge difference when it comes to the game play, but the OS also makes a big difference. This is when you create a game the process will vary from one OS to the next. The new iOS is one of the most well developed OS of the mobile devices, and this is why it is different to create a game for the iOS than if you were using one of the Android OS.

Why the iOS? The iOS is currently one of the largest formats for game distribution available. Releasing a game through the Apple App store is one of the smartest moves that a game developer can make. The iOS platform will give you an instant audience of millions. This is extremely beneficial for anyone that may be new to game development or trying to become better known in the gaming industry. It only costs $99/Year to become a member. This will allow you to work with Apple in order to release your games or offer them through their store. Another reason that the iOS is so attractive is simple; it eliminates a lot of the garbage. Scams and garbage games are not allowed or tolerated through the Apple App store. This means that you do not have people sifting through as much junk in order to find your game. This is an attractive benefit for it makes your game more visible.

The Setup iOS has multiple game engines that you can create a game for, but the most commonly selected one is the cocos2d for iPhone. The cocos2d offers a feature list which includes the OpenGL ES-based graphics including integration of the physics libraries Box2d and Chipmunk, a particle system, scene management, effects such as waves, ripples, etc), sound support, tile maps, and more. The iOS is not the only one to take advantage of the cocos2d for it is also used by the Mac OS X.

This means that you can effectively develop a game that can be place on the iPhone, iPod, iPad, and Mac by utilizing the cocos2d. Another advantage to utilizing the cocos2d is that there are quite a few sources that are already established that will be able to help you learn how to create games for the cocos2d. This should make like a lot easier when you are considering creating a game. The cocos2d is not the only engine for iOS game development. It is simply the most popular.

Stencyl If you are someone that is new to game development for the iOS then visit Stencyl. It breaks down how to develop a game for the iOS system, provides helpful hints, and even offers support. It is extremely beneficial software for someone that is unfamiliar with the entire process. It can help you with everything from design, creation, and even marketing. It is a step-by-step process, or you can simply jump to the category that you may need the most assistance.

The best part is that you don’t have to know coding to have the game finished. Of course there is an option to use code and to develop advanced games. Take advantage of this great place that can give you a jumpstart on your game development dreams.

Need an alternative? Another great starting point for game development is Gamesalad which, like stencyl requires no previous coding knowledge.

 

Jun 13

Indie Game Development – Where to start?

Not since the day of the Sinclair Spectrum back in the early eighties has independent game development been so big. The advent of the smart phone meant that you didn’t need big budgets or smart 3D graphics to get your game to market. A huge user base wanted simple, fun and cheap games and indie game developers rose again to rival even the biggest of the game giants.

I am by no means an expert in indie game development and nor am I a fully trained game programmer with an education in game theory, level mechanics or usability. Each indie dev’s journey is different and the following article will share with you my advice based on my experiences over the past few years.

First off you need to really want to make games for the joy of making games as game development is not a ‘get rich scheme’ and you can’t just knock out a poor Angry Birds clone and expect the millions to come rolling in. Creating a good game takes time and you would be looking at an absolute minimum of three months from concept to testing.

If you decide to take the plunge then start small and come up with a simple game idea and build on it. Mario was originally called ‘Jump Man’ for a reason and his debut was a simple but addictive game and Pac-Man employs quite a clever enemy logic. In order to stop early disappointment you should think about ‘shelving’ your big game idea until your second, third or fourth game in order for you to get a grasp on all the elements of game design and development.

I don’t know how to code? When it comes to game development you have the choice of learning code or using a drag and drop approach; either way you have options. I am a graphic designer by trade so the drag and drop approach appealed to me first. If this avenue appeals to you then I would strongly recommend starting with either Gamesalad or Stencyl and if you want additional functionality and are willing to put in the leg work then Corona.

Choose Your Weapon Gamesalad is the more established game creation engine and has a great community within its forums. There are plenty of people willing to help you throughout your journey and you have many people from fresh meat to seasoned professionals to chew the fat with. This engine uses .png graphics and has an easy to use drag and drop functionality with allows you to see exactly what you are creating in real time. There are plenty of free templates to help you muddle through and further premium templates to help you understand the more complicated actions. This is a great starter engine as it uses ‘behaviors’ to tell the graphic what to do such as ‘when the graphic is touched, move 300px left’.

The Stencyl game engine uses similar functions such as scenes, behaviours and physics but is more based around drawing directly into the scene with spritesheets instead of placing the pre-made individual game graphics. The addition of an image editor built in also means this is more of an ‘all-in-one’ solution but if you are happy to use illustrator, photoshop, gimp or inkscape to create your elements then you might find the image editor limiting. Unlike Gamesalad the Stencyl engine uses spritesheets to handle images which is more like the more complex engines.

Moving on to the aforementioned ‘more complex engines’ I would suggest looking at Corona if you fancy trying your hand at learning code. The learning curve is steeper but the reward is much greater as this skill can be transferred as it uses OpenAL, OpenGL, Box2D, and Lua, meaning Corona uses the same industry-standard architecture as the larger companies such as Electronic Arts, and ngmoco. As this engine has greater access to the native phone functions as well as greater social connections this is a powerful starter engine. Many that start on Gamesalad or stencyl move on to corona when their games become more intensive.

Finally, if 2D is one dimension short for your liking then take a look at Unity 3D as this is what the big boys tend to use that work within the third dimension. This option is the most expensive and would require the largest commitment of time and energy. Sadly I could not advise you on this one as it would only be based on research and not actual experience. If you have any experience with program’s such as the free blender, or the more expensive maya 3D.

With any of the above engines, the one thing you need to do is give it time to learn. Make a simple game to learn the basics and build up from there as with each game you create you learn something new.

Over the next few weeks we will cover various topics to do with game design and development and hopefully help a few budding developers realise their dream to create the next big thing.

About the author

Ian Garstang is a budding indie game designer who is a graphic designer by day for the top 100 creative agency Kingsland Linassi. By night he is game designer and graphic peddler to other like minded souls. Ian currently has designed graphics for well over 50 games and has three titles currently on the app store as well as many in development. In order to aid his community Ian runs an online game graphic store called Graphic-Buffet.com

Links:

http://gamesalad.com/ http://www.anscamobile.com/corona/ http://www.stencyl.com/ http://unity3d.com/unity/publishing/ios